{"id":4422840385638,"title":"Westmoreland Milk Glass peacock creamer - as is","handle":"westmoreland-milk-glass-peacock-creamer-as-is","description":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThis is authentic USA WESTMORELAND Milk Glass. It is in excellent, mint condition. The glass is opaque, dating it to the 1940s.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\n\u003cb\u003e\u003cspan size=\"4\" color=\"#002cfd\" style=\"color: #002cfd; font-size: large;\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eABOUT WESTMORELAND\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThe Westmoreland Glass Company grew out of the Specialty Glass Company of East Liverpool, Ohio, which, in 1889, relocated to Grapeville, Pennsylvania. By 1890, production of pitchers, goblets, tumblers, and glass novelty items was underway and the company's name was changed to the Westmoreland Specialty Company. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003eWestmoreland produced virtually every type of glassware\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e, from inexpensive pressed glass \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003eto pricier cut glass\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e.  The name was changed to Westmoreland Glass Company to eliminate the confusion among consumers about what a “specialty” company might actually produce—“glass” made the company’s mission crystal clear.\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003eThroughout World War I, the Westmoreland Glass Company manufactured and distributed intricately molded candy filled glass jars i\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003en the shapes of automobiles, trains, and even revolvers to newsstands and dime stores across the U.S. The jars were made of high-quality milk\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e, or opal, a signature material that distinguished Westmoreland glass from its competitors. An estimated 90 percent of all Westmoreland glass produced between the 1920s and ’50s was made of milk glass. Thanks to their high level of craftsmanship, Westmoreland milk glass pieces were considered some of the finest examples in the country. \u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBy the 1950s, milk glass seemed the best financial bet for the company. Many of the patterns produced during that decade were designed to capitalize on the material’s earlier popularity. As the 1950s drew to a close, though, the popularity of milk glass waned. Westmoreland struggled through the 1970s, and by the time the 1980s rolled around, it was facing hardship. On January 8, 1984, almost 100 years after its founding, the factory shut down production.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eABOUT MILK GLASS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMilk glass is an opaque or translucent, milk white or colored glass that can be blown or pressed into a wide variety of shapes. \u003cspan\u003eOpaque Glass originated in 16th century Venice and came in a variety of colors, including white, pink, yellow, blue, and brown. The white variety beloved today rose to prominence during the Victorian era, when it was coveted as an economic dead-ringer for porcelain. The Victorians also get credit for coining the term \"milk glass.\" Its production and popularity waned during the Great Depression but saw a resurgence after World War II. Thanks to a frenzy of mass production during the 1950s and 1960s from companies such as Anchor Hocking, Fenton, and Westmoreland, the mid-century finds are readily available today.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2019-12-18T17:22:11-05:00","created_at":"2019-12-18T17:22:11-05:00","vendor":"Eileen Sirmans","type":"","tags":["decor","entertaining","farmhouse","vintage"],"price":600,"price_min":600,"price_max":600,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":31231559499878,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Westmoreland Milk Glass peacock creamer - as is","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":600,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":"","requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_allocations":[]}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191218-172256.jpg?v=1576707857","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191218-172302.jpg?v=1576707857"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191218-172256.jpg?v=1576707857","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":null,"id":5837550977126,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.75,"height":4032,"width":3024,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191218-172256.jpg?v=1576707857"},"aspect_ratio":0.75,"height":4032,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191218-172256.jpg?v=1576707857","width":3024},{"alt":null,"id":5837551009894,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.75,"height":4032,"width":3024,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191218-172302.jpg?v=1576707857"},"aspect_ratio":0.75,"height":4032,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191218-172302.jpg?v=1576707857","width":3024}],"requires_selling_plan":false,"selling_plan_groups":[],"content":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThis is authentic USA WESTMORELAND Milk Glass. It is in excellent, mint condition. The glass is opaque, dating it to the 1940s.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\n\u003cb\u003e\u003cspan size=\"4\" color=\"#002cfd\" style=\"color: #002cfd; font-size: large;\"\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eABOUT WESTMORELAND\u003c\/strong\u003e\n\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThe Westmoreland Glass Company grew out of the Specialty Glass Company of East Liverpool, Ohio, which, in 1889, relocated to Grapeville, Pennsylvania. By 1890, production of pitchers, goblets, tumblers, and glass novelty items was underway and the company's name was changed to the Westmoreland Specialty Company. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003eWestmoreland produced virtually every type of glassware\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e, from inexpensive pressed glass \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003eto pricier cut glass\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e.  The name was changed to Westmoreland Glass Company to eliminate the confusion among consumers about what a “specialty” company might actually produce—“glass” made the company’s mission crystal clear.\u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003eThroughout World War I, the Westmoreland Glass Company manufactured and distributed intricately molded candy filled glass jars i\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003en the shapes of automobiles, trains, and even revolvers to newsstands and dime stores across the U.S. The jars were made of high-quality milk\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cspan\u003e, or opal, a signature material that distinguished Westmoreland glass from its competitors. An estimated 90 percent of all Westmoreland glass produced between the 1920s and ’50s was made of milk glass. Thanks to their high level of craftsmanship, Westmoreland milk glass pieces were considered some of the finest examples in the country. \u003c\/span\u003e\n\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003cspan\u003eBy the 1950s, milk glass seemed the best financial bet for the company. Many of the patterns produced during that decade were designed to capitalize on the material’s earlier popularity. As the 1950s drew to a close, though, the popularity of milk glass waned. Westmoreland struggled through the 1970s, and by the time the 1980s rolled around, it was facing hardship. On January 8, 1984, almost 100 years after its founding, the factory shut down production.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cdiv\u003e\u003c\/div\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eABOUT MILK GLASS\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eMilk glass is an opaque or translucent, milk white or colored glass that can be blown or pressed into a wide variety of shapes. \u003cspan\u003eOpaque Glass originated in 16th century Venice and came in a variety of colors, including white, pink, yellow, blue, and brown. The white variety beloved today rose to prominence during the Victorian era, when it was coveted as an economic dead-ringer for porcelain. The Victorians also get credit for coining the term \"milk glass.\" Its production and popularity waned during the Great Depression but saw a resurgence after World War II. Thanks to a frenzy of mass production during the 1950s and 1960s from companies such as Anchor Hocking, Fenton, and Westmoreland, the mid-century finds are readily available today.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Westmoreland Milk Glass peacock creamer - as is

Product Description
Maximum quantity available reached.

This is authentic USA WESTMORELAND Milk Glass. It is in excellent, mint condition. The glass is opaque, dating it to the 1940s.

ABOUT WESTMORELAND
The Westmoreland Glass Company grew out of the Specialty Glass Company of East Liverpool, Ohio, which, in 1889, relocated to Grapeville, Pennsylvania. By 1890, production of pitchers, goblets, tumblers, and glass novelty items was underway and the company's name was changed to the Westmoreland Specialty Company.
Westmoreland produced virtually every type of glassware, from inexpensive pressed glass to pricier cut glass.  The name was changed to Westmoreland Glass Company to eliminate the confusion among consumers about what a “specialty” company might actually produce—“glass” made the company’s mission crystal clear.
Throughout World War I, the Westmoreland Glass Company manufactured and distributed intricately molded candy filled glass jars in the shapes of automobiles, trains, and even revolvers to newsstands and dime stores across the U.S. The jars were made of high-quality milk, or opal, a signature material that distinguished Westmoreland glass from its competitors. An estimated 90 percent of all Westmoreland glass produced between the 1920s and ’50s was made of milk glass. Thanks to their high level of craftsmanship, Westmoreland milk glass pieces were considered some of the finest examples in the country. 
 
By the 1950s, milk glass seemed the best financial bet for the company. Many of the patterns produced during that decade were designed to capitalize on the material’s earlier popularity. As the 1950s drew to a close, though, the popularity of milk glass waned. Westmoreland struggled through the 1970s, and by the time the 1980s rolled around, it was facing hardship. On January 8, 1984, almost 100 years after its founding, the factory shut down production.

ABOUT MILK GLASS

Milk glass is an opaque or translucent, milk white or colored glass that can be blown or pressed into a wide variety of shapes. Opaque Glass originated in 16th century Venice and came in a variety of colors, including white, pink, yellow, blue, and brown. The white variety beloved today rose to prominence during the Victorian era, when it was coveted as an economic dead-ringer for porcelain. The Victorians also get credit for coining the term "milk glass." Its production and popularity waned during the Great Depression but saw a resurgence after World War II. Thanks to a frenzy of mass production during the 1950s and 1960s from companies such as Anchor Hocking, Fenton, and Westmoreland, the mid-century finds are readily available today.