{"id":4426469343334,"title":"Antique Volcanized Black Trunk","handle":"antique-volcanized-black-trunk","description":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eMade of genuine hard vulcanized trunk fibre. The brass and fixtures are all in solid state, some pitting, rusting.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eABOUT VULCANIZED FIBRE\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003cb\u003eVulcanized fibre\u003c\/b\u003e is a laminated plastic composed of only cellulose. The material is a tough, resilient, hornlike material that is lighter than aluminum, tougher than leather, and stiffer than most thermoplastics.  \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe British patent for vulcanized fibre was obtained in 1859 by the Englishman Thomas Taylor.\u003cspan style=\"font-size: 12.5px;\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eIn 1871 Thomas Taylor obtained the United States Patent for vulcanized fibre.\u003cspan style=\"font-size: 12.5px;\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThe first organized industrial company to make vulcanized fibre, was the Vulcanized Fibre Company, incorporated first as a New York Corporation formed June 19, 1873.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe process for making vulcanized fibre starts with paper made out of cotton rags. \u003cspan\u003eBefore the processing of wood pulp and chemical wood pulps in the mid-19th century, the dominant fibre source for paper making was cotton and linen rags. The paper was passed through a vat of zinc chloride solution to swell and gelatinize the cellulose in the paper. Once the paper was saturated, plies of paper were pressed together and the cellulose bonded. The zinc oxide was then leached out of the paper product it is was then dried.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThe final product is a nearly 100%-cellulose mass free from any artificial glues, resins, or binders. The finished vulcanized fibre was highly useful because it offered high tear and tensile strength, while in the thinner thicknesses allowing flexibility to conform to curves and bends. In thicker thicknesses, it could be moulded to shape with steam and pressure. This fibre became highly popular for steamer trunks because of the aforementioned properties. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e","published_at":"2019-12-20T20:47:51-05:00","created_at":"2019-12-20T20:47:55-05:00","vendor":"Cliff and Laurie Alsberg","type":"","tags":["antique","decor","furniture","vintage"],"price":39500,"price_min":39500,"price_max":39500,"available":true,"price_varies":false,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":31237755306086,"title":"Default Title","option1":"Default Title","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":true,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Antique Volcanized Black Trunk","public_title":null,"options":["Default Title"],"price":39500,"weight":0,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":1,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":"","featured_media":null}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191220-203533.jpg?v=1577999814","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191220-192335.jpg?v=1577999814"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191220-203533.jpg?v=1577999814","options":["Title"],"media":[{"alt":"Antique Volcanized Black Trunk","id":5852016771174,"position":1,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.841,"height":3594,"width":3024,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191220-203533.jpg?v=1576892875"},"aspect_ratio":0.841,"height":3594,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191220-203533.jpg?v=1576892875","width":3024},{"alt":"Antique Volcanized Black Trunk","id":5852016803942,"position":2,"preview_image":{"aspect_ratio":0.75,"height":4032,"width":3024,"src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191220-192335.jpg?v=1576892875"},"aspect_ratio":0.75,"height":4032,"media_type":"image","src":"https:\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/1201\/1846\/products\/20191220-192335.jpg?v=1576892875","width":3024}],"content":"\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eMade of genuine hard vulcanized trunk fibre. The brass and fixtures are all in solid state, some pitting, rusting.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eABOUT VULCANIZED FIBRE\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e\u003cb\u003eVulcanized fibre\u003c\/b\u003e is a laminated plastic composed of only cellulose. The material is a tough, resilient, hornlike material that is lighter than aluminum, tougher than leather, and stiffer than most thermoplastics.  \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe British patent for vulcanized fibre was obtained in 1859 by the Englishman Thomas Taylor.\u003cspan style=\"font-size: 12.5px;\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eIn 1871 Thomas Taylor obtained the United States Patent for vulcanized fibre.\u003cspan style=\"font-size: 12.5px;\"\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eThe first organized industrial company to make vulcanized fibre, was the Vulcanized Fibre Company, incorporated first as a New York Corporation formed June 19, 1873.\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003eThe process for making vulcanized fibre starts with paper made out of cotton rags. \u003cspan\u003eBefore the processing of wood pulp and chemical wood pulps in the mid-19th century, the dominant fibre source for paper making was cotton and linen rags. The paper was passed through a vat of zinc chloride solution to swell and gelatinize the cellulose in the paper. Once the paper was saturated, plies of paper were pressed together and the cellulose bonded. The zinc oxide was then leached out of the paper product it is was then dried.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003eThe final product is a nearly 100%-cellulose mass free from any artificial glues, resins, or binders. The finished vulcanized fibre was highly useful because it offered high tear and tensile strength, while in the thinner thicknesses allowing flexibility to conform to curves and bends. In thicker thicknesses, it could be moulded to shape with steam and pressure. This fibre became highly popular for steamer trunks because of the aforementioned properties. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e \u003c\/p\u003e\n\u003cp\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003c\/p\u003e"}

Antique Volcanized Black Trunk

Product Description
Maximum quantity available reached.

Made of genuine hard vulcanized trunk fibre. The brass and fixtures are all in solid state, some pitting, rusting.

ABOUT VULCANIZED FIBRE

Vulcanized fibre is a laminated plastic composed of only cellulose. The material is a tough, resilient, hornlike material that is lighter than aluminum, tougher than leather, and stiffer than most thermoplastics.  

The British patent for vulcanized fibre was obtained in 1859 by the Englishman Thomas Taylor. In 1871 Thomas Taylor obtained the United States Patent for vulcanized fibre. The first organized industrial company to make vulcanized fibre, was the Vulcanized Fibre Company, incorporated first as a New York Corporation formed June 19, 1873.

The process for making vulcanized fibre starts with paper made out of cotton rags. Before the processing of wood pulp and chemical wood pulps in the mid-19th century, the dominant fibre source for paper making was cotton and linen rags. The paper was passed through a vat of zinc chloride solution to swell and gelatinize the cellulose in the paper. Once the paper was saturated, plies of paper were pressed together and the cellulose bonded. The zinc oxide was then leached out of the paper product it is was then dried.

The final product is a nearly 100%-cellulose mass free from any artificial glues, resins, or binders. The finished vulcanized fibre was highly useful because it offered high tear and tensile strength, while in the thinner thicknesses allowing flexibility to conform to curves and bends. In thicker thicknesses, it could be moulded to shape with steam and pressure. This fibre became highly popular for steamer trunks because of the aforementioned properties.